Classes+Field Trips


  • The Art of Weaving a Life: Mask | Cathi Belcher
  • The Art of Weaving a Life: Sacred Bundle | Cathi Belcher
  • Techniques in Lichen Dyeing | Rachel Bingham- Kessler
  • Three Bags Full: Exploring Wool |Rachel Bingham- Kessler
  • Techniques in Safflower Dyeing | Rachel Bingham- Kessler
  • Techniques in Indigo Dyeing | Rachel Bingham- Kessler
  • Botanical Printing | Eva Camacho
  • Mending Your Way Through Indigo | Eva Camacho
  • Introduction to Brioche | Bristol Ivy
  • Short Rows | Bristol Ivy
  • A Lace for Everything and Everything in Its Lace | Bristol Ivy 
  • Abstract Landscapes with Fiber + Thread | Katherine Ferrier
  • Explorations in Improvisational Patchwork| Katherine Ferrier
  • Contemplative Writing for Makers | Katherine Ferrier
  • Crochet for Knitters | Cal Patch
  • Crochet on the Edge| Cal Patch
  • Crochet Rag Rug | Cal Patch
  • Embroidery Basics | Cal Patch
  • Coiled Baskets  | Casey Ryder
  • Rigid Heddle Weaving:  Clasped Weft | Casey Ryder

Weaving a Life: Mask (2 3-hr sessions)| Cathi Belcher

Weaving is a metaphor for life, and The Weaving a Life Process, created by Susan Barrett Merrill, is an approach to re-visioning ourselves and our possibilities through a series of simple weavings. These projects, called key forms, are created on a small portable loom called the Journey Loom.

The key forms – an Amulet, Bowl, Doll, Belt, Mask, Sacred Bundle, and Shawl – are elemental forms common to all cultures throughout the world. Holding symbolic significance, each becomes a physical manifestation of personal meaning when woven with intention. Weaving a Life is a personal, creative process, revealing the vision and gifts we already hold inside.

In this class, we’ll get a brief overview of the entire Weaving a Life process, and will weave the MASK. Over the course of the workshop, some serious work will be created, all in an atmosphere of joy & storytelling, mixed with fairy-dust and lots of fun!


Weaving a Life: Sacred Bundle (2 3-hr sessions)|Cathi Belcher

Weaving is a metaphor for life, and The Weaving a Life Process, created by Susan Barrett Merrill, is an approach to re-visioning ourselves and our possibilities through a series of simple weavings. These projects, called key forms, are created on a small portable loom called the Journey Loom.

The key forms – an Amulet, Bowl, Doll, Belt, Mask, Sacred Bundle, and Shawl – are elemental forms common to all cultures throughout the world. Holding symbolic significance, each becomes a physical manifestation of personal meaning when woven with intention. Weaving a Life is a personal, creative process, revealing the vision and gifts we already hold inside.

In this class, we’ll get a brief overview of the entire Weaving a Life process, and will weave the MASK. Over the course of the workshop, some serious work will be created, all in an atmosphere of joy & storytelling, mixed with fairy-dust and lots of fun!


Techniques in Lichen Dyeing (3 hours) | Rachel Bingham- Kessler

We’ll explore the three ways to dye with lichens. This will be a lab-intensive class where we’ll discuss respectful methods of collecting lichens, what type of lichens to look for and where, how to set up the best dye vats to get the most out of the lichens. We’ll work with tiny sample skeins and tiny silk fabric samples. You’ll also learn some lichenology along the way to help assist you in the field on future collection journeys. 

Materials Fee: $10 payable to instructor

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Three Bags Full: Exploring Wool  (3 hrs) |Rachel Bingham- Kessler

Have you ever wondered how Shetland wool works up compared to Finn? Icelandic compared to Corriedale? We’ll explore a handful of Maine grown wool breeds by working through small samples of raw wool into its full potential. This will be a hands-on lecture-style class where we discuss and handle various breeds. We’ll cover how best to use each wool whether it be for baby knits, tapestry weaving needle felting or wet felting. By the end, you’ll be able to decide how best to use your wool samples. You could take them home as is, or work on them throughout the week. 

Materials Fee: $10 payable to instructor


Techniques in Safflower Dyeing (3 hours) | Rachel Bingham- Kessler

Safflower is a beautiful, ancient, and elusive dye to work with. Working best with plant-based fibers, safflower allows you to achieve two very different colors from one dye pot. We’ll be experimenting with small linen and silk samples to get a feel for how this all works and explore some of the possibilities. 

Materials Fee: $10 payable to instructor


Techniques in Indigo Dyeing  (4 hours) | Rachel Bingham- Kessler

Indigo is just so magical. We’ll focus on building layers up to the deepest darkest blues possible. Doing so takes TIME and patience. Please bring to class: 2 skeins of white natural fiber yarn OR 1 Skein of yarn and 1/2 yard of natural fiber fabric that has been washed. *please note- this is all we will have time and room for in class. *


Botanical Printing (2 3-hr classes) | Eva Camacho

Learn the art of hand-dyeing using only the natural pigments and colors found in plants. During the workshop you will make several samples using wind fallen plant material as you learn about botanical-printing: the complex natural dyeing technique of laying out leaves on fabric, bundling and boiling the fabric to produce stunning results. This workshop will also cover painting with natural pigments. 

Please bring: 2-3 yards of different types of silk, preferably white, 1-2 yards of wool, both preferably white, rubber gloves, rusty scrap metal, 6-8 wooden sticks, 6-8 metal sticks (iron or copper) 30 rubber bands (wide), 2 rolls of cooking string, cotton Scissors, 1 pad (36 sheets) 9” x 12” Strathmore cold press watercolor paper, an old bath towel and any plant materials for dyeing (eucalyptus, maple, Japanese maple, rose leaves, etc…). I will provide plenty of plant material, but please bring what you’d like to experiment with. Notebook, pencil and/or for sketching and taking notes. 


Mending Your Way Through Indigo (2 3-hr classes) | Eva Camacho

During the first part of this workshop students will learn how to make two different fermented indigo vats (henna and sucrose), and dye their fabrics, yarns, threads, fibers, etc. Students will be able to achieve different shades of indigo depending on how many times they dip into the vats. During the second part, students will learn basic mending stitches using the indigo fabrics and a foundation for stitching. 


Introduction to Brioche (3 hrs) | Bristol Ivy

Brioche is an easy stitch that creates a lush, drapey, warm fabric. In this class we’ll learn the basic principles of working brioche flat and increasing and decreasing in pattern.  Experience needed: knitting, purling, increasing, decreasing.

Materials and homework: Approximately 70 yards of worsted weight yarn and US 7 needles for swatching and practicing.


Short Rows (3 hrs) | Bristol Ivy

Short rows are a very handy way to add shaping to your knitting in both conventional and unexpected ways. Use them to turn a heel on a sock, better tailor a garment to your shape, or add unexpected twists and turns to accessories. In this class, we’ll discuss the mechanics of short rows, try out different short row techniques, and think about when and where to use them. Experience needed: decreasing.

Materials and homework: Smooth, non-haloed, light-colored worsted weight yarn and appropriate needles. Students should cast on 20 stitches and work about an inch in stockinette prior to class, ending after a WS row.


A Lace for Everything and Everything in Its Lace (2 3hr classes) | Bristol Ivy 

Lace is one of the most beautiful ways to manipulate your knitting into something truly spectacular.  In this six-hour class, we’ll work on designing our own lace patterns based on multiple inspirations: visual, encoded, and improvisational.  From there, we’ll explore how to incorporate your very own lace pattern into a cowl of your own design.

Materials: Approximately 100 yds of smooth, non-haloed, light-colored worsted weight yarn and appropriate needles for swatching patterns.  In addition, students should bring their preferred yarn to make a 24” (100-300 yards), 36” (250-500 yards), or 60” (400-800 yards) cowl in their very own lace pattern.


Felted and Stitched: Abstract Landscapes with Fiber and Thread (2 3-hr classes) | Katherine Ferrier 

In this class we’ll savor working with our materials. We’ll start by making the base of our landscape, beginning with fiber, which we’ll learn to wet felt, so that it becomes a sturdy fabric. This process takes time and is deliciously physical, hands-on, and satisfying. After a break for lunch, we’ll learn a few basic embroidery designs, and then spend the afternoon stitching on our landscapes, to highlight or hint at natural forms such as rivers, hills, trees, and stars. Each student will make two small felted and stitched landscapes by the end of the day. 

Please bring: 2 large, old towels, an apron and $10 for a materials kit, which will include everything else you need. 


Following the Thread: Explorations in Improvisational Patchwork (Two 3 hour classes) | Katherine Ferrier

Do you love playing with color, texture, design and pattern?  Are you a fan of juxtaposition, fascinated with how things come together? Have you always wanted to learn to make a quilt, but fussy construction, complicated measurements, and traditional patterns just aren’t for you? In this workshop, we’ll practice slowing down, paying attention and putting the pieces together. Using improvisational approaches to design as metaphors for composing our lives, we’ll cultivate mindfulness as we play with fabric, hand-piece either a small wall hanging, or “mug rug” and exploring several methods of backing and finishing our work.
No sewing experience necessary

PLEASE BRING:  bag lunch and $10 for materials – if you’d like to bring any of your favorite scraps to use or share with the group, feel free, but the materials kit will be sufficient.


Making, Being, and Being Made: Contemplative Writing for Makers (2hrs) | Katherine Ferrier

If making is a practice of paying attention, what can we learn about ourselves, and the world, by tuning in to the layers of meaning and metaphor embedded in every thread of our lives as makers? How is making its own kind of making sense? How does what we make in turn make us? This workshop is one part making, one part meditation, and one part contemplative/creative writing. We’ll begin with some quiet, meditative handwork, (sewing, stitching, spinning knitting, drawing, etc) each tending to our own work. From this place of deep listening and connection, we’ll work with a variety of writing prompts that will act as invitations into memory, metaphor, and meaning. There will be space for sharing our writing with each other so that we might deepen our appreciation of how our personal stories are interwoven with and connected to the world around us. No formal writing experience is required.

Please bring some handwork and a journal. It’s best to bring something you can work on without concentrating too much, so that your hands can be steadily working, leaving your thoughts to drift into the rich realms of memory and meaning. Simple stitching/embroidery materials can be provided for those in between or without projects for a materials fee of $5.


Crochet for Knitters (3 hrs) | Cal Patch

Are you a knitter who avoids any knit pattern with even a hint of crochet? A little crochet knowledge can be a fun and helpful tool in every knitter’s box! Use it for decorative or practical edgings, button bands, joining, or embellishing with flowers or other motifs. Once you know how to wield a hook AND a needle, you’ll be invincible! Note: Students should know at least chain and single crochet; can be rusty but not the first time!

Supplies: Scrap yarn (worsted to fingering), crochet hooks, knit swatches to work onto (can be old gauge swatches or cut from old machine-knit sweaters)


Crochet on the Edge (3 hrs)| Cal Patch

Adding a crocheted yoke to the neckline of a T-shirt is a stunning way to upcycle, or make from scratch, unique and gorgeous garments!  You will learn several ways to work directly into the edge, and then experiment with different crochet stitches to design your own statement piece. Students must be comfortable with the basic stitches (at least ch, sc and dc).

Please bring: Supplies: Assorted scrap yarns to play with (fingering/sock is a great size), compatible hooks (smaller steel hooks are great if you have them), an old T-shirt that needs a makeover, Tapestry needle (a slightly smaller needle can also be helpful), Scissors


Crochet Rag Rug (3 hrs) | Cal Patch

With the most basic of crochet skills (chain and single crochet stitches) you can make your own fabric rugs out of any textile you like! You will learn how to wield a jumbo hook, join your strips, and make a variety of shapes of rugs. Make one for every room in your house, and they’re an ideal housewarming gift too! Students must know at least chain and single crochet stitches.

Supplies: Jumbo crochet hook (a few sizes in range of 12-20mm), 1 or more yards of woven fabric (cotton sheets, yardage or scrap). 1 or more T-shirts to cut up, scissors.


Embroidery Basics (3 hrs)| Cal Patch

Adding a touch of embroidery can turn nearly any plain thing into an heirloom. You can stitch on clothes, home goods, accessories and other textiles you’ve made yourself, or bought pre-made. By embellishing on these items, you can make gifts more personal, commemorate events, hide mending or stains, or just give a tired old item a new life.
We will learn 12 different classic embroidery stitches and experiment on a free-form sampler, or a project of your choice. Once you know how, you’ll want to add a touch of stitched decoration to everything you own, make or give.

Please bring: a fat quarter or approximately 18″ square of woven cotton or linen cloth (gingham works great) for your sampler, embroidery floss and needles, and some small scissors


Coiled Baskets  (3 hrs) | Casey Ryder

Coil baskets have a rich history having been made around the world by indigenous people, often using similar techniques.  In the Northeast, Native Americans have used sweetgrass and pine needles as their core “fibers,” but we will be using cotton clothesline.  We will use yarn as our fastener, to attach the core to itself in an outward and upward spiraling pattern.  You will learn different stitch techniques as a means of function as well as design. Students are welcome to bring their own bits of yarn for wrapping, but yarn will also be provided.

Materials fee:  $5 for core + booklet + yarns


Rigid Heddle Weaving:  Clasped Weft  (9 hrs over 3 classes) | Casey Ryder

Clasped weft weaving is a technique sometimes utilized in tapestry weaving to create a variety of shapes.  We will explore the design elements of clasped weft weaving, using contrasting weft yarns on a rigid heddle loom. Rigid heddle looms are simple looms that allow you to easily weave yardage of plain weave cloth.  In the first class, you will learn the math of setting the loom up and learn to warp the loom using direct warping.  Depending on your experience, you may choose to set your loom up for a small mat, a pillow cover, a table runner, or a scarf.  

In the second class you will play a bit with design, sketching out your ideas on paper.  We will discuss methods of transferring your ideas onto your loom before we begin weaving. Please plan on spending at least an hour each day outside of class time on your weaving, perhaps more if you’re wanting to weave a longer piece.  We will gather once more at the end of the week to finish our pieces.

No rigid heddle weaving experience is necessary.  Rigid heddle looms will be provided unless you prefer to use your own.

Students should bring:

  • yarn – total of 400 yards of sport weight yarn – WPI should be 12-14.  This means when you wrap your yarn around a ruler, 12-14 wraps fit in one inch, with the yarn touching itself, but not smooshed.
  • at least 200 yards of one yarn for the warp
  • 2 contrasting yarns.  They can contrast in color, texture, shine, etc.  The more contrasting, the more your pattern will show.
  • a sketchbook + colored pencils in the colors of your yarn
  • Measuring tape + scissors + straight pins
  • If you are bringing your own loom, please bring all accessories + a 7.5 or 8 dent reed

2019 field trips
To be announced

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